Why #DeleteFacebook is the Unintended Consequence of Facebook’s “I’m Sorry” Tour

(Irvine, CA) March 22, 2018 – We are rooting for Facebook™, the social networking company, but they must first restore its forfeited trust. Until then, ScanMyPhotos.com is urging its worldwide customers who had pictures digitized to immediately delete them from the entire Facebook platform.

Founded in 1990, ScanMyPhotos, based in Irvine, Calif. has digitized more than 500 million pictures. As longtime advocates on important consumer and social issues, the company is urging every Facebook user to delete their account and not upload any pictures.

ScanMyPhotos is an unaffiliated content provider for all photo-sharing app innovators, including the behemoth Facebook platform. Yet, the photographic data that was digitized, then uploaded may become a doormat for data breaches. Will it be used by obstructionist advertisers who wield the market power to control content, often without awareness from Facebook’s unsuspecting users?

Cambridge Analytica LLC, the British-based data mining company accused of exploiting and improperly obtaining personal information from 50 million Facebook users underscores an alarming practice, yet it is just the tip of a haunting iceberg of alleged corruption. With $40 billion in 2017 advertising revenues, Facebook is everywhere and boasts 2 billion monthly users. One-quarter of all people use the platform which leads to lots of eyeballs, yet may be unsecured from fraud and misappropriating content shared by its users.

“Protecting the privacy of customers is the core of everything we do at ScanMyPhotos, yet Facebook let us and every user down. As loyalist advocates, we had recommended people upload their newly digitized pictures to post and share on Facebook,” said Mitch Goldstone, President & CEO of the e-commerce photo digitization service.

The problem with Facebook goes beyond making sure this does not happen again. It must be regulated, just as all other advertising is, and they must also lead with an “honest ads act” transparency law.

Founded in 2004 by Mark Zuckerberg in Cambridge, MA (not Cambridge Analytica), the CEO yesterday said: “privacy issues have always been incredibly important to people. One of our biggest responsibilities is to protect data.”

In response, Goldstone explained that “the social-media advertising company’s market power and priorities are misguided, as privacy must be their single biggest imperative. This is why they are now embroiled in this historic controversy. Facebook’s unsuspecting users are just the product, as the advertisers have become the customers.”

Few ever read or understand the legal terms of service contract prior to hypnotically clicking to approve. What happens to the uploaded pictures? Will a forensic audit of the firm reveal whether not just users’ background information, but their content and pictures may have been exploited and breached?

While Mr. Zuckerberg agrees to rectify the lost trust, he hasn’t “seen a meaningful number of people act on that [Delete Facebook campaign].” ScanMyPhotos hopes to get on their radar along with millions of others to create a movement to help restore trust. However, the advertising-supported business model, where users are the product is broken. According to Brian X. Chen, lead consumer technology writer for The New York Times, deleting Facebook is just the beginning as they own many other apps which are under its umbrella, including WhatsApp and Instagram. Closing your account may take days to process. For many, especially businesses, it is not so easy to delete Facebook as it has become a primary means to conduct commerce.

In a 2009 interview with the BBC’s Laura Trevelyan, when asked “so just to be clear, you’re not going to sell, or share, any of the information,” Zuckerberg replied: “the person who’s putting the content on Facebook always owns it… This is their information and they own it. What the terms say is just, we’re not going to share people’s information.” So much for Mark Zuckerberg’s presidential aspirations. Rhetorically, we wonder how that campaign would work – he, after all, commands of the very tools to duplicate and magnify Cambridge Analytica’s transgressions.

The Zuckerberg “I’m sorry” apology tour just does not cut it. This problem occurred three years ago.

Until their public responsibility is resolved and trust restored, ScanMyPhotos presses upon users to #DeleteFacebook.



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5 Photo Challenges You’ll Want to Participate in on Social Media

photo challengesSocial media has changed the way in which we share and take pictures. Facebook personally ushered in the rise of the selfie while Instagram made food photography an everyday occurrence. These days, we’re so used to seeing our friends and loved ones share pictures and posts that it’s fun to step outside our comfort zones and participate in some photo challenges.


The following list includes five fun photo challenges you’ll want to try out. Some have been around forever and a few are currently trending. Check it out.

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Photo Study Reveals 81% Of All Pictures Digitized Used For Social Media Sharing

150dpi Photo Scanning Is The New Norm

Today, ScanMyPhotos.com announced the results of a 3 month study of 940 consumers who had their pictures digitized. The results of their top use is no surprise, as 81% of all analog photos scanned are just used for social media sharing.

Archiving and photo preservation has taken a less aggressive role, as people are mostly using pictures to share.  The takeaway is that the once standard 600 dpi high resolution quality is not as necessary today.

The Race To Digitize Pictures Is On

This is big news for Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter and the leading photo-sharing app, Google Photos. Most people were just uploading recent pictures captured from smartphone devices, yet there are 3 1/2 trillion analog snapshots which are not yet digitized. With the advent of bulk photo scanning, the race to digitize has taken on new urgency and dimensions.

DPI (Dots Per Inch) or PPI (Pixels Per Inch) relates to the number of device pixels per inch (pixel density). The higher the number, the smaller the size of the pixels, so graphics are perceived as more crisp and less pixelated. Good quality printing uses around 300dpi which is higher than most displays. But, most smartphone devices, messaging apps, like WhatsApp, and computer monitors demand a much lower and often compressed file size.

Therefore, for the 81% of people just digitizing pictures, today, the new norm is 150dpi. ScanMyPhotos.com provides all three services, from social media scanning at 150dpi, to 300 dpi for archival scanning, and the ultra high professional 600dpi quality scanning. If you are not enlarging your pictures, most people just need 150 or 300dpi scans today.

Details and how to order 150, 300, and 600dpi professional scans are provided at ScanMyPhotos.com

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How a Mom Honors the Memories of Her Lost Son


Jackie’s late son Danny posing with Minnie and Mickey at Disney in the fall of 1989.

We snap pictures at the drop of a hat these days. Interesting dinner? Take a picture. Dog in a funny pose? Take a picture. Family snuggled together watching a movie? Take several pictures from every angle imaginable.

But while we’re busy taking these pictures, we rarely stop to think about the importance of each one—or how significant and powerful these photos might one day become.

ScanMyPhotos customer Jackie, however, knows all too well the incredible value photos can have.

“My son Danny passed away in 1990—he was only 12. After I sent my pictures to ScanMyPhotos, I gave two other family members the extra sets so that if anything ever happened, the pictures of Danny would always be around. That’s what I wanted to do the most by scanning my print photos—I needed to preserve his memory.”

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Facebook AI Can Now Search Photos Using Any Keyword

facebook aiTimes are certainly changing. We recently found out that a new Facebook AI technology is now joining the ranks of that of Google Photos or the Apple Photos App.

The social media giant now lets users search its pictures by typing in content from the image.

Say, for example, you’re looking for a photo you were tagged in five years ago. You run into a snag when you can’t remember who took the picture, but you do remember it was at a birthday party with lots of balloons. To find your photos, simply type in the word “balloons” and Facebook will do the rest.

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