What to Expect from a Photography Class

Some people have no problem using their camera and seem to have an innate ability to take fantastic photos.


But most of us are more comfortable with a camera after taking a few lessons or a course. If you’re one of these people, here are a few things you should know beforehand:



What You’re Getting Into: Do some research to find the right photography class! Think about what you like, what you would like to develop more in your photography or what you’d like to learn about. Use that information to choose your course. Knowing what you’re signing up for will not only ensure you enjoy yourself, but it will make life a lot easier for the workshop organizers and your classmates.


Where You Put Your Camera Manual: We know it’s big and boring-looking, but the camera’s manual can really help you troubleshoot your technology. Chances are, your instructor won’t be able to work with you one-on-one to figure out exactly how the different focus modes work on your specific camera. So, knowing how your equipment works (or at least knowing where you can find the manual online) can help.



Be Ready to Go Beyond the Assignment: When you’re first learning, you’ll probably need to take more photos than you think for your assignments. If you are taking a traditional darkroom class and a teacher asks for four final images, you will probably shoot at least two rolls of film. If you aren’t happy with the results, keep shooting! It’s the only way to learn.


 

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5 Black-and-White Photography Tips

One of the main reasons people want to shoot photographs in black-and-white is because it lends a timeless quality to the images.


Here, in no particular order, we present some tips for helping your black-and-white photos come out as works of art:


1) Look for subjects with strong shapes and lines, texture and detail. Remember that the composition of your photo will rely on contrast. Sometimes, shadows will define shape and form, so pay attention to areas of both darkness and light. Fine detail, or strong textures (such as clouds, stones or foliage) can help give your black-and-white photos depth and interest.


2) Set your ISO to the lowest setting possible. This is important in order to avoid noise, which becomes more obvious in black-and-white photography, especially in low light situations.


3) When photographing a portrait, keep your backgrounds simple and clean. This will help make sure that your subject is in focus and that details pop.  


4) When photographing a landscape, look for imagery that offers grays along with contrast and lighting.


5) Check your histogram. This is the graphical representation of the tonal values of your image. When you frame an image, check your histogram to make sure there is a full range of tonality available in the viewfinder.


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How to Take Incredible Party Photos

party photosWe are officially at the height of party season. Christmas and New Years will be here before you know it and we’ll be attending all sorts of parties and events to celebrate.

 

So, to ensure you’re snapping the best possible party photos at your next shindig, we pulled together the following list of tips and tricks.

 

Take a look:

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How to Make a DIY Photo Booth for Holiday Parties

Young couple in a Photo Booth party with garland decoration backgroundPhoto booths are all the rage these days. Chances are you’ve seen them popping up at weddings, sweet sixteens, anniversaries, birthdays, block parties, and more. While these booths are typically set up by a professional photographer, it’s possible to have one at your party without the assistance of a seasoned pro.

 

With the right gear on hand, a DIY photo booth can be easily pulled together. Let’s take a quick walk through what you’ll need to build a fun photo booth for your holiday party.

 

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