Create a New Year’s Resolution Vision Board for 2019

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADid you know that one of the biggest recent break-out pop stars, Meghan Trainor, created a vision board to map out her success? Before she made it to the top of the charts, she used a vision board to remind her of what she wanted to achieve, including a record deal, and a photo of the Grammy’s. Trainor then went on to achieve those things and more—and you could do the same in the coming New Year.


Now’s the perfect time to create a New Year’s resolution vision board that will help you paint the picture you want to see for your life in 2019.


What is a vision board?


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How to Take Remarkable Holiday Photos

Santa Gets a Bear HugBetween the excitement, non-stop activity, and inevitable exhaustion, it can be incredibly hard to snap holiday photos that truly capture the happiness, surprise, and delight of the season.


Here are some tips on how to snap not one, but many, remarkable holiday photos:


Take “tight” shots


Move in close to your subject, whether it’s the entire family, or just the kids, so they fill up the entire frame. If you’re taking candid shots, zoom in so as not to distract the subject. Tight shots produce photos that are much more impressive and impactful than ones filled with distractions.



Snap an excessive amount of photos


This is especially true when you are trying to take a group shot because capturing everyone looking perfect at once is a monumental task. Adjust the settings on your camera to burst or continuous mode so it will take photos in rapid succession – and snap away. Take more photos than you think you will need. You can always delete the awful ones later!


Turn off the flash when indoors


If you are taking photos indoors, turn off the flash to prevent the artificial light it emits from making a photo appear “flat.” During the day, position your subjects near a window (but not in front of it!) to take advantage of the natural light. At night, turn on every light in the room and light up the space like a stadium.


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5 Must Read Photography Magazines

Aperture Summer 2018

Aperture

Last year, “Popular Photography” folded after more than 80 years of tips, product information and inspiration. There are plenty of great resources online and in print, but we couldn’t help but mourn the loss of the iconic publication. So, we rounded up five of the best magazines to keep you up-to-date on the latest technology an motivated by professional and amateurs in the field.

 

 

1. Nature Photographer

“Nature Photographer” is a how–to magazine, published in print form three times a year covering all four seasons. The magazine is intended for nature photographers and nature enthusiasts who range from beginners to professionals. For those interested in photographing the wilderness, whether it’s in far-off destinations, local parks or your own backyard. Learn the techniques needed to consistently produce quality images and research the locations that will appeal to you most. Articles include:

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6 Must-Read Articles to Help You Keep Photos in Top Shape

Keep Photos in Top ShapeBest Ways to Protect Your Photographs


The world is a dangerous place for photos. Light, temperature, humidity, skin oils, glue—all of this can all cause serious damage to photos over time. In the digital age, this is no big deal; photos can be reprinted from our computers or devices with the click of a button. But for our older photos, which are our most treasured, the results of neglect can be tragic.



The following six articles provide tips, tricks, and services that will help keep photos in top shape.

 

1. The Best Ways to Store Printed Photos

 

“Archival quality photo albums use plastic and paper materials that will not damage or deteriorate photos over the long-term.”

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5 Tips for Taking Photos in the Rain

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Cherry blossoms in spring rain from Pinterest. Photo by Kujio Tomisha

By Vanessa Mallory Kotz

 

As spring finally starts to show its lovely face here in the Mid-Atlantic, people are coming out of their apartments and houses with joyful expressions and lighter outerwear. Dog walkers have an extra pep in their step. Children tiptoe through the tulips and their parents take dozens of photos of the cherry blossoms right as they are about to fade. The last few days, however, it has rained. A lot. Staring out the window at the overcast skies and thinking of all those tourists at the Tidal Basin makes me wonder—what is the best way to take photos in the rain? I scoured the Internet for tips from the pros. Here are five of the best.


 

 

 

 

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1. Protect your gear
Look for shelter (a store awning, parking garage or porch. Also, carry an umbrella and a raincoat. “Not necessarily for yourself — nobody cares if the photographer gets wet. I mean a raincoat made specifically for cameras. These are available from a number of manufacturers in a variety of shapes and sizes, capable of covering not just the lens and camera but an attached flash as well. You can find a decent one for not a lot of money. If you’re more of the DIY type, you can use a plastic bag — preferably a clear one.” –Jason D. Little for Light Stalking 



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2. Pay attention to reflections
“One of the great things about reflections is that they tend to help lighten up an image –especially if it’s night, and you have a light source, such as streetlamps, that are reflecting off of the water. While most people think of crystal-clear water when reflections come to mind, ripples at the surface can add some unique texture to your composition, and the result will be more abstract than a mirrored image.” –Christina Harman for Loaded Landscapes 


 

 

 

 

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3. Be patient
“As many landscape photographers will testify, a great time to shoot is immediately after the rain stops. Rain enhances colors, and as the sun emerges you’ll see some great opportunities, possibly even a rainbow.” –Staff Writer for Amateur Photographer

 



4. How to shoot from your car
It you are trying to get a picture during a downpour, trust nature photographer Art Wolfe. Park at an angle that will keep the weather out of your open window. It also helps to know the behaviors of your subjects, which for one shot were a herd of Impalas in Kenya. ‘“The rain was so heavy,” he says, “that the animals stopped and stood facing away from it. The impala just stopped moving, because, in that type of rain, they assume that the rainstorm will be over in 20 minutes. It’s not worth moving during that time into uncertain territory when they have marginal visibility. There could be lions waiting for them. They just waited out the rain, and I was able to position myself and get that shot.”’ –Jack Crager for Popular Photography


 

 

 

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5. Be on the lookout for joy or misery
“Rain transforms people. We react to rain with a gamut of emotions, from the sullen dread of rain-drenched commuters to the wondrous joy of children. Capture those emotions and you’ll have a great rain picture.” –Jim Richardson for National Geographic

 

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