5 Tips for Indoor Photography

Are you feeling frustrated with indoor photography? Here are some ideas to help make your indoor photos look better:indoor photography

 

Take advantage of daylight.  Shoot your photos wherever sunlight is available, whether that’s by a window or a doorway. Take note of what kind of light enters each room throughout the day. You’ll notice that sunlight has a warmer look at sunrise and sunset. At midday, it has a cooler or neutral color. Use this to add different effects to your photos.

 

Use a reflector!  Not only is this one of the cheapest pieces of equipment you can buy, but it is also one of the easiest pieces of equipment you can make yourself! Here’s how you make a reflector:

Step 1: Get a blank piece of white poster board or paper.

Step 2: Have someone reflect it on your subject!

That’s it!

 

Blank white paper can provide you with a lovely, soft fill source for any shadows on your subject, and helps give your photograph a professional look. If you need something stronger, use a piece of tinfoil to cover that piece of paper.

 

Avoid direct overhead lighting. Make sure your subject takes a few steps away from the light source so that it bounces from the floor onto your subject instead. Direct overhead lighting often casts unflattering shadows.

 

Turn off your flash. This is along the same lines as the previous suggestion, because the flash on your camera can result in a washed out, unflattering photograph if you use it indoors.  Avoid it at all costs, even if you need to raise the ISO.

 

Pay attention to the details.  Whether you’re photographing a group of friends in your living room or working on a paid architecture gig, the details matter!  Look at the countertops — are there pens and paper that belong in the shot, or can they be stashed somewhere else? Are there dishes in a sink? Is a lamp coming out of someone’s head? Take the time to stage your photograph.

 

Do you have other questions about indoor photography? We are big fans of Digital Photography School, so be sure to check out their site from some of the best photographers in the world. 

 Happy photographing!


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What to Expect from a Photography Class

party2 300x201 - What to Expect from a Photography ClassSome people have no problem using their camera and seem to have an innate ability to take fantastic photos.


But most of us are more comfortable with a camera after taking a few lessons or a course. If you’re one of these people, here are a few things you should know beforehand:



What You’re Getting Into: Do some research to find the right photography class! Think about what you like, what you would like to develop more in your photography or what you’d like to learn about. Use that information to choose your course. Knowing what you’re signing up for will not only ensure you enjoy yourself, but it will make life a lot easier for the workshop organizers and your classmates.


Where You Put Your Camera Manual: We know it’s big and boring-looking, but the camera’s manual can really help you troubleshoot your technology. Chances are, your instructor won’t be able to work with you one-on-one to figure out exactly how the different focus modes work on your specific camera. So, knowing how your equipment works (or at least knowing where you can find the manual online) can help.



Be Ready to Go Beyond the Assignment: When you’re first learning, you’ll probably need to take more photos than you think for your assignments. If you are taking a traditional darkroom class and a teacher asks for four final images, you will probably shoot at least two rolls of film. If you aren’t happy with the results, keep shooting! It’s the only way to learn.


 

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5 Black-and-White Photography Tips

One of the main reasons people want to shoot photographs in black-and-white is because it lends a timeless quality to the images.


Here, in no particular order, we present some tips for helping your black-and-white photos come out as works of art:


1) Look for subjects with strong shapes and lines, texture and detail. Remember that the composition of your photo will rely on contrast. Sometimes, shadows will define shape and form, so pay attention to areas of both darkness and light. Fine detail, or strong textures (such as clouds, stones or foliage) can help give your black-and-white photos depth and interest.


2) Set your ISO to the lowest setting possible. This is important in order to avoid noise, which becomes more obvious in black-and-white photography, especially in low light situations.


3) When photographing a portrait, keep your backgrounds simple and clean. This will help make sure that your subject is in focus and that details pop.  


4) When photographing a landscape, look for imagery that offers grays along with contrast and lighting.


5) Check your histogram. This is the graphical representation of the tonal values of your image. When you frame an image, check your histogram to make sure there is a full range of tonality available in the viewfinder.


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How to Share Pictures at Family Reunions

Photography: Family Reunion Tip


When extended families gather together, from grandparents to siblings and first cousins, the convergence of multi-generational ancestors is made extra memorable when everyone shares pictures. Not just those recent activities stored on mobile devices, but also generations of analog photo snapshots, 35mm slides, and negatives from yesteryear. This helps build a legacy of storytelling to unite families on a genealogical tour to recall ancestors and the whole family’s history.


APS Negative Scanning 35 MM Negative Scanning Prepaid Photo Scanning Box Family Generation Collection Pay-Per-Scan Photo Scan Service Prepaid Slide Scanning Box


Photo Tip: Ask Guests to Share Decades-Past Scanned Pictures


FAMILY REUNION PHOTO TIP


1) SCAN. Start by asking each family member to gather all their photographs and have each one digitized. There are several easy ways to affordably digitize pictures, from the ScanMyPhotos.com pay-per-scan option, to its popular fill-the-box services to scan about 1,800 pictures, and the much larger Family Generations Collection, where more than 10,000 photos are digitized with free shipping and completed in days.


Family viewing photos on TV2) NARRATE AND RECORD. At the reunion, gather together in front of a large television and sync to the photo files. Set up a camcorder in the rear of the room to record the narratives, as each person shares the stories behind the picture. This is always emotional, and filled with laughter and even weeping chronicles of past events and remembrances from deceased relatives. Provide all the attendees with a copy of the recorded walk down the genealogical path to preserve your family’s timeline.


For a wealth of photo digitizing tips, visit ScanMyPhotos.com

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How to Take Incredible Party Photos

party photosWe are officially at the height of party season. Christmas and New Years will be here before you know it and we’ll be attending all sorts of parties and events to celebrate.

 

So, to ensure you’re snapping the best possible party photos at your next shindig, we pulled together the following list of tips and tricks.

 

Take a look:

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