Poll: Divorce #1 Reason People Digitize Family Photos

Stack of photos, bulk scanning[update June 7, 2019]


Cheryl Strayed and Steve Almond wrote this in the New York Times Style Section about: “I’ve Shed the Emotional Baggage of Divorce. But What About All This Stuff? When a bonfire is not an option.” Read more.


For us at ScanMyPhotos, the business of supporting people during a divorce is emotional, highly delicate and sensitive. When it comes to who keeps the family pictures, we share how you can observe civility and evenly share those memories from happier times?



The only thing inexpensive and amiable about a marital split is who gets to keep the memories pictured in photographs. The in-laws, “outlaws” and everyone in the family can easily get archived digital copies from all their photos.


All too often, we hear about friends, relatives, and celebrities calling it quits to their marriage, which evokes a very common question, who gets the family pictures?


In today’s all-digital world, the answer is as simple as a press of the button to easily share everything electronically. But, what about those decades-past analog photos, 35mm slides, and film negatives? That task is much more arduous, and often enters a caustic battle over who gets to retain the family pictures.



During the past two months, ScanMyPhotos.com has conducted an outreach campaign asking people why they digitize pictures? The answers from 940 respondents were across the board– from the expected family reunions, anniversaries, and even memorial services. The second most popular reason why people digitize pictures is due to all the popular photo-sharing apps, like Google Photos, Instagram, and Twitter.


However, in a heavy-hearted reaction, the most common reason people digitize pictures is due to a separation, where a couple needs to divide their possessions. This is often followed by combative discussions, which occasionally end up costing thousands in legal fees. And, that is before a single picture is digitized. It is highly emotional. Reexamining pictures from yesteryear and happier times is a particularly sensitive undertaking.


Continue reading

What is National Parent’s Day? How To Celebrate #NationalParentsDay

Honoring Everyone’s Parents on Sunday, July 28


mom2 300x200 - What is National Parent's Day? How To Celebrate #NationalParentsDayThis upcoming Parent’s Day, which falls on the fourth Sunday in July, is a wonderful day to honor the special people in our lives. The idea is to add an extra day, beyond Mother’s and Father’s Day to celebrate parents.



Let’s take this holiday to look back on our lineage and roots, and to ask our parents about their lives and memories from growing up. 8 Ways to Celebrate National Parents’ Day.


mom3 300x200 - What is National Parent's Day? How To Celebrate #NationalParentsDayMany ScanMyPhotos customers do this after they’ve sent their old photos to us. They’ll then walk their parents through the digital copies and ask them questions about the past. Find those boxes of old photos in the attic to do the same this Parent’s Day. Together, we can ensure our parent’s lives and history are preserved for generations to come. Follow our Tales From the Pictures We Saved podcast for emotional, real stories from families who shared stories about their parents.



We encourage everyone to share #NationalParentsDay on social media.


Continue reading

Comparing photo scanning apps to professional digitizing

Are scanning photos at 72 dpi good enough?


Let’s start by saying we celebrate the competition. With trillions of pre-digital photos to scan and all our shared passion to help many preserve their nostalgic photo memories, there is room for all.  But, when it comes to using those photo scanning apps, there is a capacious challenge. the resolution in which pictures are scanned. Is 72 dpi enough? No.


From a recent Lifewire profile explaining how Google PhotoScan works, Jerri Ledford shared this advisory and that according to her, Google Photos’ PhotoScan app digitizes mages at just 72 dpi (pixels per inch):


image1 300x184 - Comparing photo scanning apps to professional digitizing

 

 

 

 

 



ScanMyPhotos launched one cent photo (social media) scanning at 150 dpi, (archival) 300 dpi, and (professional 600 dpi scanning for pictures. 35mm slide scanning and film negative scanning are also popular services.


Photo Scanning and the 300 vs 600 DPI Myth — Why In Most Cases 150 DPI Image Resolution Is All You Need.



Continue reading

Why Maureen Taylor and The Photo Detective® Is Our Top Genealogy Expert

We have a big tip for you that spans decades and generations. If you are into genealogy, history and an archivist, you must have heard about Maureen Taylor, the Photo Detective®. As an internationally renowned expert in historic photo identification, preservation, and genealogical research, Maureen has long been our go-to source.


Before sharing one of our favorite tips by Maureen, you will quickly understand who we are raving fans. She is regularly featured in print media and on national TV programs like The Today Show, The View, the Boston Globe, and MSNBC. As the author of 11 books and active blogger, she also is a contributing editor to Family Tree Magazine.




 

Maureen interviews our dear friend, Gary Pageau, who knows the photo imaging industry better and longer than anyone. Bonus. Find out how The Dead Pixel Society got its name.



Credit: excerpt reprinted with permission by Maureen Taylor

The Big Reveal: What Will YOU Discover?


Friday is a big day in my life. It’s a special day set aside for photo consults with clients. I get to peek into your incredible collections and solve mysteries.


Each session starts with a question: “How did you hear of me?”


Some folks have been hanging on to one of my business cards for years waiting for the right moment to reach out. Others find me by searching the web. In other cases, it’s word of mouth.


It doesn’t really matter how they found me, only that they did.


I love a mystery. I’m not particularly fond of mystery books, but put a picture in front of me and it’s an entirely different matter. It borders on obsession.


So you may be wondering why people seek me out for a consult. The answer is…it varies.


It could be a completely unidentified image that is driving someone crazy because it eludes his or her family history connection. For instance, Dorothy knew everyone in her pictures except one. I gave her a research outline to follow. Bingo! Case solved.


It might be an image with a curious prop. One of my clients had a picture of an ancestor with a strange looking musical instrument in the background. A bit of research and a connection with a music historian revealed it was a melodeon. That piece of family history wasn’t written in a census record or a vital record. The picture clues told the story of one man’s fascination with music.


Our ancestors leave us odd packets of images that defied their attempts to identify them. They knew the family name from which those pictures descended but not the names to go with the faces. For one client matching up the images with information in the census finally put names with an envelope of photos, his grandfather left him.


Every consult is a bit different because each of your family stories is unique. While each consult is as unique as your family history, they all share one thing– suggestions on where to look for additional answers. Don’t be surprised if I assign homework too. <smile> Your family history doesn’t stop once the photo is identified or dated, for me the most interesting stories get revealed through putting the pieces together through documentation, research, and image clues.


Let me help you discover a “lost” piece of your family history by looking at your pictures.


Continue reading