Prepare for the Worst, Expect the Best: Observing National Preparedness Month

National Preparedness MonthWe’re in the business of preservation, so when National Preparedness Month rolls around each September, we take it very seriously. Disaster can strike anywhere, at any time, and for no reason whatsoever—but we can make sure we’re prepared.

 

Sponsored by FEMA and the Department of Homeland Security, National Preparedness Month was started to encourage everyone to be proactive in our approach to disasters. In fact, each week of September has its own theme:


  • September 1-5: Flood
  • September 6-12: Wildfire
  • September 13-19: Hurricane
  • September 20-26: Power outage
  • September 27-30: Lead up to National PrepareAthon! Day (September 30th)

Continue reading

Photograph Preservation 101: How to Get Glue off of Photos

photo-gluePutting photos in one of those sticky backed albums or scrapbooks may have seemed like a good idea at the time, but unless you made copies, preserving those photos might be tough.

 

Your first step will be to pull those photos off the pages without ripping or damaging the prints. Your second step will be to send those photos to us so we can scan them and make digital copies for you to keep for years to come.

 

But let’s not get too ahead of ourselves—getting that glue off in the first step will be tricky. If you try using force or ripping the photos off the pages, you run the risk ruining the photos forever. Fortunately, we can help.

Continue reading

What You Need to Know About Restoring Ripped Photos

Restoring Ripped PhotosTips for restoring damaged photos


It’s one of the worst feelings in the world: that moment when you hear an old print photo rip or tear in your hands. This commonly happens during a photo-scanning project when trying to remove old pictures from an ancient adhesive-lined photo album.


Hindsight is 20/20 and we now know to only store print photos in archival quality albums—however, the damage has been done and now you need to know how to go about restoring ripped photos. This link provides an easy fix for restoring damaged photos


So, what do you do when you try to remove a photo from a sticky situation only to have the thing fall to pieces? Here’s what we suggest:


Continue reading

How to Preserve Your Photos and Keep Them Safe

There are a few common mistakes people may unintentionally make when displaying or transporting photos. We share these common mistakes and several helpful ways to easily avoid damaging photos to ensure a long life time for those special photos.


Best DIY Tips to Your Preserve Photos That Are in Frames and On Display:


damaged-picture-frameEliminate direct sunlight on the photo. Just like everything else that is exposed to the sun will result in damages to your photograph. Direct sunlight deteriorates and rapidly fades pictures than if they are strategically placed where there will be minimal direct sunlight. If there is no possible way to avoid direct sunlight on the photo than it would be best to invest in a picture frame that has UV protection glass. Without UV protection, severe damage that will be done to the photograph can make photo restoration extremely difficult or even impossible.



Moisture, or water damage, is one of the most common ways a photo can be damaged. This type of damage can be caused by a variety of factors, such as liquid coming into direct contact with the photo, hanging a photo in a moist area (near a kitchen sink or in a bathroom), living in a high humidity climate, or even spraying glass cleaner directly on the glass of the frame (allowing moisture to seep underneath the glass). Once moisture gets trapped in the frame, the photo paper has no way to breathe or dry out it will eventually become damaged.

The best way to avoid most moisture related problems is to prevent your picture from touching the glass of the frame. You can do this by using spacers, or picture frame mats, so there is space created between the picture and the glass for air to flow.



Also, avoid spraying glass cleaner directly on the glass of the frame. Problems often occur when the cleaning solution runs down the side of the glass and comes in contact with the photograph. In time this can cause the photo to stick to the glass and if you try to remove the photo from the glass, it will peel off the emulsion of the photo paper and ruin the picture.



Never expose your pictures to drastic changes in temperature. Pictures are made out of paper and if exposed regularly to temperature fluctuations it will degrade the photo paper more rapidly. Be cautious when storing photographs in attics, garages, or any storage room that doesn’t have proper insulation.

 

Continue reading