5 Tips for Indoor Photography

Are you feeling frustrated with indoor photography? Here are some ideas to help make your indoor photos look better:indoor photography

 

Take advantage of daylight.  Shoot your photos wherever sunlight is available, whether that’s by a window or a doorway. Take note of what kind of light enters each room throughout the day. You’ll notice that sunlight has a warmer look at sunrise and sunset. At midday, it has a cooler or neutral color. Use this to add different effects to your photos.

 

Use a reflector!  Not only is this one of the cheapest pieces of equipment you can buy, but it is also one of the easiest pieces of equipment you can make yourself! Here’s how you make a reflector:

Step 1: Get a blank piece of white poster board or paper.

Step 2: Have someone reflect it on your subject!

That’s it!

 

Blank white paper can provide you with a lovely, soft fill source for any shadows on your subject, and helps give your photograph a professional look. If you need something stronger, use a piece of tinfoil to cover that piece of paper.

 

Avoid direct overhead lighting. Make sure your subject takes a few steps away from the light source so that it bounces from the floor onto your subject instead. Direct overhead lighting often casts unflattering shadows.

 

Turn off your flash. This is along the same lines as the previous suggestion, because the flash on your camera can result in a washed out, unflattering photograph if you use it indoors.  Avoid it at all costs, even if you need to raise the ISO.

 

Pay attention to the details.  Whether you’re photographing a group of friends in your living room or working on a paid architecture gig, the details matter!  Look at the countertops — are there pens and paper that belong in the shot, or can they be stashed somewhere else? Are there dishes in a sink? Is a lamp coming out of someone’s head? Take the time to stage your photograph.

 

Do you have other questions about indoor photography? We are big fans of Digital Photography School, so be sure to check out their site from some of the best photographers in the world. 

 Happy photographing!


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A Step-by-step Guide to Organizing Digital Photos and Pictures

organizing digital photosWe’ve talked before about digital clutter, but it’s a never-ending issue that will only continue to grow with time. As it is, we all have the old laptops or computers that are basically “albums” of digital photos we haven’t seen in years—it’s such a shame! Our digital photos should be ready at our fingertips to use for the next #tbt or Facebook post opportunity.


So if you’re ready to tidy up your digital clutter, let’s start with what we know the best: digital photos and pictures.


The following steps will take you through how to organize, catalog, and maintain your digital images. It may take a bit of effort at first, but once you put a system into place, the upkeep will be a breeze.

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5 Photo Tips to Take Great Photos for Instagram

Did you know? More than 40 billion photos and videos have been shared on the Instagram platform since it was launched in 2010!

  Taking pictures for Instagram

Whether you’re already a fan of the photo-sharing platform or want to get started, here are some ideas for how to take a GREAT photo for Instagram and make your account really stand out.

 

Plan your picture! Just like taking any other photograph, getting a good picture for Instagram requires planning. Of course, there are happy accidents, but you should put yourself in a position to get a good photo. Scout your location, try different angles and plan around the light.



Take LOTS of photos. Getting that perfect photo for Instagram doesn’t take just one shot. It may take 10 to 20 photographs of a single subject before you are able to get the right one.

How to take pictures for uploading to Instagram from ScanMYPhotos

Shoot your photos outside of the app. Use the native camera app on your iPhone or Android, rather than the Instagram camera, when shooting photos for the social network. Not only will it help you follow our previous tip of taking multiple shots of the same scene, but it offers more control than the Instagram camera.

 

Take your time with your edits. Instagram has a lot of sophisticated editing tools included in the app. There are lots of ways to tweak your picture and make it worthy of internet viewing! You can rotate your photo, zoom in and out, straighten, and adjust the horizontal and vertical perspective. There’s a tool to adjust the contrast and saturation of your photos to make images more vibrant, and another to change the warmth. And, of course, there are lots of filters. This barely scrapes the surface of Instagram’s editing abilities — you can read more here!

 

Don’t forget the #hashtags. Once you’ve uploaded your photo, you’ll want to use hashtags to make sure they get seen across the internet.  Hashtags can be incredibly effective, but only when they are used correctly. It’s important to be specific and creative, and please don’t use a half dozen broad, random hashtags (#blessed, #love, #photo, #togs, #bestagram, #instamasters, #instagood). As one photographer says:

 

“Hashtags are part of what makes Instagram such a creative and fun place to be. But if your strategy is to get people to see your photo and like it, then you are doing it wrong. If you are going to use a hashtag use one, and use the right one. Find a cool one or start your own.”

 

Get more tips here!

 

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Photographing the Northern Lights without The Expensive Gear

Do you dream of taking a National Geographic-worthy photograph of the Northern Lights? We talked with Lance at the Travel Addicts about how to do it!

photograph the northern lights

For the purposes of this article, we assume that you are in a place where you can see the Northern (or Southern) lights and that it is night time when you are trying to take the photograph. If these are your circumstances, then there is a reasonable chance you will get a picture of the Northern Lights!  

 

First and foremost: Lance says that any decent camera will be enough for a great picture of the Northern Lights. It doesn’t matter if you use a point-and-shoot camera or the one on your smartphone: In this day and age anyone can take a decent Northern Lights photo.

 

He also says that there are only two pieces of equipment that are absolutely necessary: A camera and a tripod.  

 

“There is no way to get a decent Northern Lights photo without a tripod,” says Lance. He explains that it doesn’t need to be a fancy or expensive one; it just needs to be something that keeps the camera from moving when you’re taking the picture. (Check out this one here!)

 

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How to Make Your 2018 New Year’s Resolution Stick

resolutionGetting organized is one of the most popular New Year’s resolutions to make—and it’s a resolution we wholeheartedly endorse, especially when it comes to preserving your precious memories. But as the year wears on, the likelihood of achieving these resolutions wanes.

 

In order to help you stick to your resolution, we pulled together a list of tricks that will make it much easier in 2018.

 

Break Your Big Resolution into Smaller Goals


If your resolution feels insurmountable, then it will be! See if you can break out your big goal into smaller more manageable goals. For example, if your resolution is “Get more organized,” try breaking it out into smaller tasks like:

 

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