8 Travel Photography Tips from the Travel Addicts

If you love to travel, you probably know the Travel Addicts (aka, Lance and Laura), one of the first and most popular travel blogs out there. What started in 2008 as an online journal has morphed into a must-read blog for thousands and thousands of people who are planning a trip or just looking for some inspiration.

 

The Rock of Cashel in Ireland

The Rock of Cashel in Ireland, a great example of an interesting angle. Copyright 2013 Travel Addicts.

They such consummate travelers that, when I asked Lance during a recent phone call about his favorite travel destination, he hesitated. “It’s very difficult to answer that question, having been to somewhere north of 50 countries. If you asked us today, we would say our favorite country is Slovakia and our favorite city is Rome. In Slovakia, you can have truly amazing travel experiences for pennies.”

 

Lance and Laura have honed their photography skills over the years as well, and they were more than happy to share their top 8 travel photography tips:


 

1. Basic cameras are perfectly fine

 

Our biggest tip: You don’t need truly amazing camera equipment to take great photos. iPhones and point-and-shoot cameras can, in a lot of situations, do just as good of a job as a high-end DSLR camera. Laura took a photo during a trip to Ireland last year that has been used by a magazine in Australia, and Dublin bought the rights to the photo to use on their new website. She took it on an iPhone, she didn’t set up the shot – she just saw it at the moment and knew, that’s it.

 

2. Capture candid moments

 

We all take photos of our family in front of, say, the Taj Mahal, but the photos that will be most memorable are the candids. When your child is playing in the sand at the beach and he doesn’t know you’re taking the photo, you have all the time in the world to set up the photo because your subject is so focused on what he is doing. Focus and capture those candid moments because it creates a really compelling image.

 

Red house from Kulusuk in Eastern Greenland

The red house from Kulusuk in Eastern Greenland is a nice example of using color and contrasts (in this case, a texture contrast of wood, water, and rock.) Copyright 2010 Travel Addicts.

3. Focus on colors and contrasts

 

Vibrant colors add a lot to the photo. Even a little bit of blue sky does wonders because it brings in some elements of natural lighting. If you’re taking a picture of something with bright red in it, the red adds a layer to the photo you won’t get otherwise.

 

4. Get off the beaten path

 

Go around the corner, and see what’s there. If you’re walking down the main boulevard in a city, you might not come into contact with those interesting, slice-of-life shots that are truly memorable unless you go off the beaten path.

 

5. The late afternoon light is as good as the early morning light

 

A lot of photographers say that early morning light is best, but we’re night owls. We are not getting up at 5 am to take photos! Late afternoon light can be just as good.

 

If there’s a place we know is going to be really photogenic, sometimes we schedule our day knowing we want to take photos there late in the afternoon.

 

6. Look for very different angles

 

When you’re going to that iconic place – the Eiffel Tower or the Coliseum in Rome – look for a way to make it interesting. Bring a plant or bush into the foreground or offset the photo so the Eiffel Tower is not right in the middle of the frame. It makes that image much more interesting (as you can see in the photo of the Rock of Cashel).

 

Keswick Hall in Charlottesville, VA

The rule of thirds. Taken at Keswick Hall in Charlottesville, VA. Copyright 2014 Travel Addicts.

7. Use the rule of thirds

 

Divide your field of view into nine boxes – it really helps you take better pictures. Shift your horizon so it’s not in the middle of the frame but in the top or bottom, or shift so your subject is to the right or left.

 

8. Learn from the photos you love

 

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6 Thanksgiving Photography Ideas You’ll Want to Try This Holiday

thanksgiving photographyTurkey day is almost here and you’ll want to make sure you’re snapping up the memories that will last a lifetime. Thanksgiving photography is an often overlooked aspect of taking pictures.


Each year we find ourselves snapping obligatory photos to mark the event but don’t often go into this special holiday with a photography strategy.

 

This year we encourage you to think outside the box and step up your Thanksgiving pictures with the tips below!

 

Thanksgiving - 6 Thanksgiving Photography Ideas You’ll Want to Try This Holiday Take the perfect turkey picture

 

The main event, the star of the show—of course, the turkey should get its own mini photo shoot on Thanksgiving! Taking an amazing picture of your turkey falls into the food photography category so you’ll want to make sure you’re following tricks for taking excellent food shots.

 

For this, you’ll want to capture sharp details so the lower the ISO, the better. You’ll also want to make sure your shutter speeds are matching your ISO—so somewhere around a 60th of a second will work (but you’ll need a tripod). From there you’ll want to manually adjust your aperture to make sure you’re getting the look you want.

 

Get candid

 

We often think of staged, Norman Rockwell type photos as our go-to photo aesthetic this time of year. But why not to add in a few action shots? Try taking some candid pictures of the host or hostess doing their thing in the kitchen, jokes and laughs shared between family members, or everyone cheering when a touchdown is scored in the big game. These photos will help you remember far more than the dinner as time wears on.

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News & Review Updates From The World of Photo Scanning

ScanMyPhotos.comLogo - News & Review Updates From The World of Photo Scanning


News and Reviews on ScanMyPhotos





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Poll: Divorce #1 Reason People Digitize Family Photos

Stack of photos, bulk scanning[update Oct 9, 2018]


Cheryl Strayed and Steve Almond wrote this in New York Times Style Section about: “I’ve Shed the Emotional Baggage of Divorce. But What About All This Stuff? When a bonfire is not an option.” Read more.


For us at ScanMyPhotos, the business of supporting people during a divorce is emotional, highly delicate and sensitive. When it comes to who keeps the family pictures, we share how you can observe civility and evenly share those memories from happier times?



The only thing inexpensive and amiable about a marital split is who gets to keep the memories pictured in photographs. The in-laws, “outlaws” and everyone in the family can easily get archived digital copies from all their photos.


All too often, we hear about friends, relatives, and celebrities calling it quits to their marriage, which evokes a very common question, who gets the family pictures?


In today’s all-digital world, the answer is as simple as a press of the button to easily share everything electronically. But, what about those decades-past analog photos, 35mm slides, and film negatives? That task is much more arduous, and often enters a caustic battle over who gets to retain the family pictures.



During the past two months, ScanMyPhotos.com has conducted an outreach campaign asking people why they digitize pictures? The answers from 940 respondents were across the board– from the expected family reunions, anniversaries, and even memorial services. The second most popular reason why people digitize pictures is due to all the popular photo-sharing apps, like Google Photos, Instagram, and Twitter.


However, in a heavy-hearted reaction, the most common reason people digitize pictures is due to a separation, where a couple needs to divide their possessions. This is often followed by combative discussions, which occasionally end up costing thousands in legal fees. And, that is before a single picture is digitized. It is highly emotional. Reexamining pictures from yesteryear and happier times is a particularly sensitive undertaking.


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Scanning My Travel Photos: The New York Times

From Stephanie RosenbloomTHE GETAWAY, The New York Times Travel section (Dec 19, 2016). Tips for everything to do with your decades-past travel photos includes a profile on ScanMyPhotos.com

 

Before joining Travel, Stephanie was a New York Times staff reporter for many sections including Business Day, Real Estate, and Styles. She was part of the team that helped create Thursday Styles; the lead reporter for the Metro desk’s Neediest Cases series; and a member of the Continuous News Desk, which provides breaking news content to NYTimes.com



Excerpt:

 

Scanning Services

 

Once you’ve turned the best of your travel photos into art, it’s time to store the rest. If boxes of prints are taking up closet (and psychic) space, there are plenty of sites online that will scan your old photos (as well as negatives, slides and videos) so you can store them digitally. But there are several things to keep in mind.

In general, these sites are a pain to navigate. They’re cluttered with too much text and fine print, and they offer so many options — Do you want your photos scanned in order? Do you want both sides of the photo scanned? — that if you don’t have a goal in mind before you go in, you can quickly be overwhelmed. Decide ahead of time what exactly you want to scan, how many photos you have and how you might use whatever you scan. Also, note that some of these companies by default send DVDs or CDs of your digital files. Not everyone has a CD or DVD player. If you want a thumb drive instead, be sure to select that option (if it’s offered) or call the company and see if it will provide one. Be aware, too, that it’s not unusual for these companies to have long lead times. A number of them digitize your photos in other countries, so it can take weeks to get your images back.


For affordable bulk scans, ScanMyPhotos.com is an old standby (you can read David Pogue’s review on nytimes.com). The company will scan about 1,800 photos at 300 dpi for $145 at its headquarters in Irvine, Calif.; the cost of sending the photo box to you, as well as the shipping of the box to ScanMyPhotos and back to you again is included in the price. That’s one of the least costly and most uncomplicated deals around. Other companies charge for shipping photo boxes. I asked a photo editor at The Times if 300 dpi is sufficient for scanning and she said that to print photos at larger sizes, a higher dpi is preferable. ScanMyPhotos has such an option: a prepaid box for $259 for the same number of scans at 600 dpi instead of 300 dpi. A thumb drive is an additional $15.95 a box.


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