5 Tips for Taking Photos in the Rain

Cherry blossoms in spring rain from Pinterest. Photo by Kujio Tomisha

By Vanessa Mallory Kotz

 

As spring finally starts to show its lovely face here in the Mid-Atlantic, people are coming out of their apartments and houses with joyful expressions and lighter outerwear. Dog walkers have an extra pep in their step. Children tiptoe through the tulips and their parents take dozens of photos of the cherry blossoms right as they are about to fade. The last few days, however, it has rained. A lot. Staring out the window at the overcast skies and thinking of all those tourists at the Tidal Basin makes me wonder—what is the best way to take photos in the rain? I scoured the Internet for tips from the pros. Here are five of the best.


 

 

 

 

 

1. Protect your gear
Look for shelter (a store awning, parking garage or porch. Also, carry an umbrella and a raincoat. “Not necessarily for yourself — nobody cares if the photographer gets wet. I mean a raincoat made specifically for cameras. These are available from a number of manufacturers in a variety of shapes and sizes, capable of covering not just the lens and camera but an attached flash as well. You can find a decent one for not a lot of money. If you’re more of the DIY type, you can use a plastic bag — preferably a clear one.” –Jason D. Little for Light Stalking 



2. Pay attention to reflections
“One of the great things about reflections is that they tend to help lighten up an image –especially if it’s night, and you have a light source, such as streetlamps, that are reflecting off of the water. While most people think of crystal-clear water when reflections come to mind, ripples at the surface can add some unique texture to your composition, and the result will be more abstract than a mirrored image.” –Christina Harman for Loaded Landscapes 


 

 

 

 

 

3. Be patient
“As many landscape photographers will testify, a great time to shoot is immediately after the rain stops. Rain enhances colors, and as the sun emerges you’ll see some great opportunities, possibly even a rainbow.” –Staff Writer for Amateur Photographer

 



4. How to shoot from your car
It you are trying to get a picture during a downpour, trust nature photographer Art Wolfe. Park at an angle that will keep the weather out of your open window. It also helps to know the behaviors of your subjects, which for one shot were a herd of Impalas in Kenya. ‘“The rain was so heavy,” he says, “that the animals stopped and stood facing away from it. The impala just stopped moving, because, in that type of rain, they assume that the rainstorm will be over in 20 minutes. It’s not worth moving during that time into uncertain territory when they have marginal visibility. There could be lions waiting for them. They just waited out the rain, and I was able to position myself and get that shot.”’ –Jack Crager for Popular Photography


 

 

 

 

5. Be on the lookout for joy or misery
“Rain transforms people. We react to rain with a gamut of emotions, from the sullen dread of rain-drenched commuters to the wondrous joy of children. Capture those emotions and you’ll have a great rain picture.” –Jim Richardson for National Geographic

 

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5 Pet Photography Photo Tips

If you’re a pet owner, chances are that you take lots and lots of photos of your furry family member.

 

But, as all pet owners know, these creatures are unpredictable, which can make it hard to get the best picture.  So here are some suggestions to help you get the best possible photo of your pet! 

 

Go where the light is best. Try not to take photos of your pet in dark rooms or when it’s very overcast outside. Bright, diffused, light is the best for a flattering pet portrait. So before you take out your camera, look at your subject’s environment and figure out where the best light is — then move to that spot.  


Try to get their personality.  Ask yourself what is unique about your pet and try to capture their one-of-a-kind character on camera. Take pictures of your pet when they are in their preferred spot, or when they’re enjoying a much-loved pastime — whether that’s snoozing on the couch or catching a ball.


Keep things quiet. There is no quicker way to confuse a dog or startle a cat than to repeat loud commands at them. Try communicating with animals nonverbally: Use hand signals, or point to invite them where you’d like them to sit. If you do need to say ’sit’, say it quietly and calmly, and only once or twice.

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Photographing the Northern Lights without The Expensive Gear

Do you dream of taking a National Geographic-worthy photograph of the Northern Lights? We talked with Lance at the Travel Addicts about how to do it!

photograph the northern lights

For the purposes of this article, we assume that you are in a place where you can see the Northern (or Southern) lights and that it is night time when you are trying to take the photograph. If these are your circumstances, then there is a reasonable chance you will get a picture of the Northern Lights!  

 

First and foremost: Lance says that any decent camera will be enough for a great picture of the Northern Lights. It doesn’t matter if you use a point-and-shoot camera or the one on your smartphone: In this day and age anyone can take a decent Northern Lights photo.

 

He also says that there are only two pieces of equipment that are absolutely necessary: A camera and a tripod.  

 

“There is no way to get a decent Northern Lights photo without a tripod,” says Lance. He explains that it doesn’t need to be a fancy or expensive one; it just needs to be something that keeps the camera from moving when you’re taking the picture. (Check out this one here!)

 

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Tips for Photographing Newborn Babies

How to Best Photograph Newborn Babies


Do you have a new baby in your life? Is there a newborn dozing next to you while you read this? If you have recently found yourself with endless opportunities to take baby photos, we have some suggestions for you!


  • Safety should always come first. Don’t use hard or sharp objects as props. Never place your newborn on high or unsteady surfaces without a spotter. Use common sense!

 

  • Photographing Newborn Babies Tips By ScanMYPhotos.com

    Try different angles. A lot of kids are all swaddled up when they’re first born, so it can be hard to get more than a little red face in your photos. So try different photo angles:  Get down low next to them, take some close-ups, stand on a stool while they’re sleeping in their crib, or even get a photo of them nursing.   


  • Keep an eye out for happy times.  Newborn babies don’t really spend a lot of time smiling. (Let’s be honest: They don’t spend a lot of time doing much of anything!) But keep an eye out for the times when he or she seems to be at their most settled and content. They may not smile yet, but there are times in a daily routine which are better than others for photos.

  • Go Macro! If your camera has a macro mode (or if you have a macro lens) use it to isolate a single body part and make that the focus of your shot.

  • Keep taking photos. Babies change every day, especially in the first few months, it’s exponential and quite amazing to watch. However, unless you’re looking for the changes you can easily miss them so it’s it’s important to take shots regularly.

  • Remember that your baby is not the only potential subject – grandparents, parents, siblings, and friends all can add context to the scene. You’ll appreciate having more than just photos of the baby by themselves!

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Making Your Photography Hobby Into a Business

Are you getting a ton of compliments on your picture-taking skills? Are people asking you to do impromptu portrait sessions?  Maybe it’s time to think about taking your photography hobby to the next level!


Photography can be a great way make some extra cash, but there are some things to think about before you set up a business and get into photography as a line of work. Here are a few tips to get you started:  



  • Make a business plan. Anyone starting a small business needs to have one of these. A business plan will serve as your roadmap, describing what you are doing and how it will be profitable. Remember to include things like ownership, cash flow, expenses, and competition.
  • Find your specialty. Are you a nature photographer? A wedding photographer? Is your expertise newborn photos, pet photos, family gatherings or portraits? Be very clear about what services you offer and your area of expertise. Having a genre will help establish your brand and stating your services offering to potential clients.
  • Make a portfolio. It’s important to be able to show off what you’re able to do. So, before you try to turn your hobby into a business, take the time to build your portfolio. You’ll want to show off images that reflect the style of shoots you want to do on a regular basis.
  • Participate in photo contests. This is a GREAT way to find out to see how your work measures up to that of other photographers at the beginner, amateur or professional levels. And,  if you’re lucky, you’ll get a prize!
  • Consider online photography. Stock photography is in high demand and is a practical way to make some money. Advertising and marketing agencies, bloggers, websites, publications — and many more! — all make regular use of stock photos. And you can sell stock photos of pretty much any genre. You can find a list of websites where you can sell your photos here: https://www.theworkathomewoman.com/selling-photos/

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