Why Preserving Photographic Evidence of Climate Change is a Priority

Photographic preservation of climate change data is a priority at ScanMyPhotos.com and why digitizing government agencies’ pictures are being provided without charge


glaciers

This photo of disappearing glaciers was captured by Ameer Boii

(Irvine, CA) Scientific evidence for warming of the climate system is unequivocal. Climate change is real.


As Andrew Freeman at Mashable explains:  For the second time since 2000, the U.S. is poised to pull out of a major climate treaty that the country itself fought hard for. Unlike the last time this happened with the Kyoto Protocol in 2001, however, the Paris Climate Agreement, which President Donald Trump is preparing to pull the U.S. out of, is widely viewed as the last, best chance the world has to avoid potentially catastrophic global warming. Also unlike Kyoto, the new agreement is entirely voluntary, making a withdrawal even more extreme. Scientists think that global climate change, if left unchecked, could bring withering droughts, more intense storms, devastating sea level rise, and more frequent and severe heat waves to many parts of the globe.


UPDATE:

  1. Trump Signs Executive Order Unwinding Obama Climate Policies.
  2. Our response to why the coal industry has been replaced by cleaner and newer renewable energy technologies.
  3. White House official: Trump plans to pull US from Paris deal

Beyond words, what are you doing to protect and support science – showing that carbon dioxide emissions from burning fossil fuels contributes to global warming? Decades of scientific data may be destroyed due to the Trump administration’s dowdy demands that politics quash facts.


Recently, the White House was looking at having the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) take down its website with educational resources and links to climate-change data. This vital data from the EPA and other federal agencies – charged with safeguarding clean, livable air and water – have a reservoir of research which may disappear. There are millions of analog photographs from research into the effects of climate change on public health, the environment, and natural disasters. The pictures don’t lie, but they represent a treasure trove of essential information on how our world is changing. Archived analog photos are used by scientists and educators worldwide, yet they are at risk of being literally destroyed.


As the Trump administration seeks to tighten controls and discourage dissenting views on climate change, American businesses are raising their voice and responding. Scanmyphotos.com is now providing free photo scanning for preserving these records. Details below.

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