“You Had Us At Hello;” Apple iPhone Turns 10

In June 2007 Apple released the very first iPhone – an iPod, phone and Internet connection all in one, operated via touchscreen and as futuristic-looking as a sci-fi gizmo. The earliest iPhone didn’t have all the features or apps it has today, but it was revolutionary nonetheless. David Pogue, of Yahoo Tech, who was one of the very first journalists to play with the iPhone before its release, reports on the history of the personal device that changed the world.


As Apple celebrates the 10th anniversary of the iPhone, a device all but culturally synonymous with the word smartphone, we are a byproduct. With 3 1/2 trillion still-analog photos to be digitized, the billion plus smartphones are missing something. Pictures. Decades past memories which need to be scanned, and that’s partly how ScanMyPhotos.com has achieved this new milestone, as we scanned our 400 millionth pictures. Most are then uploaded to share on iPhones and all photo sharing devices.  .



CBS Sunday Morning celebrates the Apple iPhone as it turns 10 years old. Happy Anniversary, iPhone!


 

Continue reading

Photo-Sharing Image Recognition Tools Advocacy Campaign #SupportBFR

ScanMyPhotos.com launches advocacy campaign supporting image recognition biometric tools championed by popular photo-sharing services. #SupportBFR

 

[Reported by ScanMyPhotos.com | Click for news release]

ScanMyPhotos

ScanMyPhotos.com digitized one-quarter billion pictures

While the practice of photobombing has become a social and cultural phenomenon lately, the practice itself isn’t anything new.

 

Since the advent of the camera, people have either intentionally tried to appear in someone else’s photo or have accidentally stumbled into the frame. Now, with biometric facial recognition (BFR) algorithms, companies like Google, Apple, Facebook, and Shutterfly, may soon be able to identify these photobombing faces across the web—and the potential is dredging up privacy concerns.

 

“When you consider the 3.5 trillion analog photos and billions of more recent digital pictures in existence, our images—in some form or another—may be entrapped in a stranger’s photo album without consent. If a person walks through the background of a tourist’s snapshot, facial recognition software may recognize the face and tag the person’s name to that picture. That photo can then be shared across the internet—with the person’s name attached, and without their permission to share it,” said Mitch Goldstone, president & CEO, ScanMyPhotos.com.

 

While the privacy implications are concerning, there are also many positives to this technology. The ability to detect a person’s image in the background of a photo could help historians make a number of connections. If, for example, an individual is researching his personal family ancestry, facial recognition could help him find photos of his great, great grandmother smiling in a (seemingly) complete stranger’s photo.
It’s for reasons like this, and many others, that ScanMyPhotos.com supports the benefits and legitimacy of biometric image-recognition tools.

 

Continue reading