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Just Added To Enhance Your Photo Scanning Order: Your Concierge Expert

Concierge expert to seamlessly oversee your order, from start to finish


Elite Concierge Expert ServiceSign Up for Your Own Elite Concierge Expert at ScanMyPhotos


The “Elite Concierge Expert” ScanMyPhotos service provides new, added benefits as you tap into our team of personalized assistants. This customer-centric service is a blueprint, built on our 28-years of experience to deliver an enhanced, superior service as we help you digitize your nostalgic photo memories.


We understand that there is a definitive difference between a fine dining experience and waiting in line at a fast food restaurant; that is why we have dedicated experts ready to be assigned to your order.


Benefits:

  • You are assigned to an Elite Concierge Experts who also oversees a dedicated team of photo technicians just for you
  • Receive a new, added level of comprehensive and expanded personalization for your photo scanning order
  • More efficient access and an easier way to connect with us throughout the entire process — from your first touch to your completed scanning project being returned to you.
  • You are our highest priority, as we seamlessly oversee your order, from start to finish
  • We remove the complexity of all your “how-to” and other questions as our highest priority to optimize your experience with ScanMyPhotos
  • Added access to directly communicate with your own personal assistant with expedited attention who will already be familiar with your order
  • This Elite Concierge Service from ScanMyPhotos is just $12.95 extra per order.
  • To order and include a dedicated concierge expert click “Add to Cart” as you are placing your order, and we handle the rest.
  • It is instant, automatic and nothing else is needed.
  • Whenever you need to reach them, just call, email or use our online help desk and you are directly connected after adding this to your order.

Behind-the-scenes tour at ScanMyPhotos via KTLA-TV


 


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Parenting Bytes Podcast: Preserving Photos From Disasters

Amy Oztan and Andrea Smith hosts of the widely popular Parenting Bytes, talk about how to preserve your photos in case of a disaster, including a conversation with ScanMyPhotos.com’s CEO Mitch Goldstone.

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The popular Parenting Bytes is featured on the CBS play.it network as a weekly podcast all about raising the digital generation. From apps and gadgets to screen time, and other digital dilemmas, they tackle all the issues that parents are facing while raising Generation Z. Each weekly episode is available on their website, Facebook page, and on iTunes.



Background: From digital dilemmas like managing screen time to new apps and devices that can make parenting easier (or at least more fun) family tech expert and host Rebecca Levey, along with tech reporter Andrea Smith, mom blogger Amy Oztan and guest parenting bloggers, explore the ups and downs of parenting in the digital age. Join them every week on Parenting Bytes where they will discuss the latest tech, gadgets, apps and issues around raising the digital generation – and maybe even learn something even your digital kid didn’t know!


Click here to listen and learn “How To Preserve Your Photos In Case Of Disaster”


Andrea, Amy and Rebecca at Parenting Bytes

 

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Google Photos, The Ultimate Users Primer

We are often asked how best to preserve and safeguard pictures once everything is digitized. The two word simple answer is the free storage site, Google Photos, where all your photos are safely backed up and organized so you can find them fast, and share those decades past memories.


PC Magazine’s feature’s editor, Eric Griffith published a primer on “Tricks to Master Google Photos, and we’re sharing some of Eric’s best tips with you.


The Power of Google Photos To Organize Your Pictures [excerpt]


  • Play With Search: You should definitely search in Google Photos, using terms common and obscure. Google’s auto-tagging of images is pretty amazing.
  • Pinch to Change Your View: Pinching or expanding your two fingers on a single image to zoom in or out is standard. Google Photos lets you change the look of the entire mobile app by pinching, so you can zoom from “comfortable view” all the way out to the by-year view, with stops at days and months in between.
  • Quick Select Pics: Hold your finger on a picture to select, then just start dragging your finger and all the pictures you touch will be selected.
  • Apply the Same Edits to Multiple Shots: If you’ve perfected the edits on one image, you can apply it to a bunch of them.
  • Back Up With Wi-Fi Only: In the mobile apps, you can turn off “Photos (or Videos) back up using cellular data” in the settings under Back up & sync. It’s a good idea for those with a limited data plan.


  • OUR FAVORITE TIP: Recover Items for 60 Days: Deleted an image you want back? Go to the menu (on mobile or web), and select Trash. Your deleted images hang out here for a couple of months before they’re truly gone.

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Why You Must Support Tagging of People in Pictures for Photo-Sharing Apps

 

An historic threat is underway — unlike anything we’ve seen since the convergence of digital photography. It is causing the leading photo-sharing apps to be embroiled in, and under fire for tagging people in pictures. Why this matters and four solutions.


ScanMyPhotos

ScanMyPhotos.com digitized more than 400 million pictures, many are uploaded to the popular photo-sharing sites

ScanMyPhotos.com supports the benefits and legitimacy of biometric image-recognition tools.  Storytelling cannot be accomplished without implementing photo-tagging, image recognition technology.  This technology is the lifeblood and centerpiece of sharing and tagging pictures.


Since the dawn of photography, analog photo tagging predated biometric facial-recognition.


 

While the practice of “photobombing” has become a social and cultural phenomenon lately, the practice itself isn’t anything new. Since the advent of the camera, people have either intentionally tried to appear in someone else’s photos or have accidentally stumbled into the frame. Now, with biometric facial recognition (BFR) algorithms, companies like Google, Apple, and Facebook are able to identify these “photobombing” faces across the web—yet, this smart way to organize and share pictures is dredging up privacy concerns.


“When you consider the 3.5 trillion analog photos and billions of more recent digital pictures in existence, our images—in some form or another—may be entrapped in a stranger’s photo album without consent. If a person walks through the background of a tourist’s snapshot, facial recognition software may recognize the face and tag the person’s name to that picture. That photo can then be shared across the internet—with the person’s name attached, and without their permission to share it,” said Mitch Goldstone, president & CEO, ScanMyPhotos.com.


While the privacy implications are concerning, there are also more incontrovertible benefits to this technology. The ability to detect a person’s image in the background of a photo could help historians make a number of connections. If, for example, an individual is researching his personal family ancestry, facial recognition could help him find photos of his great, great-grandmother smiling in a (seemingly) complete strangers’ photo.


“Helping to electronically organize photographs is a critical issue. It is enjoyed by millions, and the benefits are staggeringly beneficial. With facial recognition technology, we can vastly improve tracking history through photos. This is why we are rallying consumers, the tech and photo industries to also support this advocacy campaign,” said Goldstone.


This (Sept 21, 2017) Chicago Tribune story by Ally Marotti, provides smart insights and an update on the litigation against Shutterfly. Excerpt:


That has been one of the most-watched suits taking on the biometrics issue. Three Illinois men allege Facebook was collecting, storing and using biometric data without consent. Facebook’s attempt to get the lawsuit dismissed was denied. Some say these types of lawsuits allege damage without evidence of actual harm.


As these antiquated privacy laws are being challenged, leading tech-industry giants like Facebook and Google Photos hail new facial-recognition tools to help identify pictures. Restricting this collection and storage of biometric “faceprint” data falls outside the margins of intellectual property rules. The image-recognition tools are scanning photographs, not actually biometric face and body scans. It is just identifying people, places and things within vintage photographs.


This is different from other uses of biometrics, such as iBeacon which uses smartphone transmissions to identify people and send them marketing messages. Tagging a person in a photograph should not be considered in violation of privacy rights. There is no malice or intent to harm anyone by identifying physical characteristics, but rather a fun and easy way to organize your lifetime of photo memories.


Yet, while we could argue both sides of the debate, there are several smart solutions that could be used to protect people’s privacy.


4 Solutions to the Photo-Tagging Controversy




1) When collecting and retaining biometric identifiers, people should have an easy way to opt-out. A simple one-touch button should be accessible on every electrically stored picture to permanently and universally remove and untag your images if identified within that photograph.


2) Strengthen the terms of service and privacy policy and transfer any obligation to those uploading pictures rather than the utility hosting them.


3) Have a manual, rather than automatic enrollment policy for people to select using a facial-recognition program.


4) Prohibit the trading, selling or profiting from any biometric information that violates Terms of Service privacy provisions.


While we are advocates of biometrics and the capabilities it has to offer—particularly in terms of photo organization and history preservation—we are opening up the dialogue so others can voice their support as well.


About the author: ScanMyPhotos, founded in 1990, is an e-commerce photo digitization service that scanned more than 400 million analog pictures. To help organize and identify these lifetimes of newly digitized pictures, people are widely enjoying photo-sharing services and the magic-like assistance from image-recognition tools, and which we fully support its use.


 

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