4 35mm Slide Scanning Solutions for Your Old Pictures

slide scannerBest Tips for Digitizing 35mm Slides


In today’s day and age, if you ask a teenager what a PowerPoint slide is, chances are they might be able to tell you. If you ask that same teen to describe a projector slide show, chances are they’ll have no idea what you mean.

 

Yes, gone are the days when people would break out the projector and show friends and family the 35mm slides taken on a recent vacation. But just because those days are gone, doesn’t mean those memories are forgotten. In fact, many families have these old slides stored in boxes in the attic, collecting dust.

 

Well, if you happen to be one of these families, you’re in luck. We’ve pulled together the following slide scanner solutions that will get those old images back in use.


Store your physical slides somewhere safe

 

Just like photos, slides are prone to damage as a result of sunlight, temperature, storage methods, and improper handling. You’ll want to make sure you are storing your antique slides somewhere that is temperature controlled, out of the sun, and in an archival quality container. When handling, your hands should be clean or wear gloves made of a non-scratching fiber.

 

Organize slides in a method that works for you

 

Organization of old slides will help the digitizing and preservation process go much quicker. You can sort and catalog your slides by event, date, or the people or places in them. The key is to select an organization that works for you and your collection, and then go from there.

 

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Removing Photos from Sticky Photo Albums

Since our blog post regarding removing photos stuck on glass, we have received many requests to post some tips to remove photos stuck in photo albums. This is another hot topic in the world of photo scanning and while every method comes with risks, these tips sent in by others are the most frequent “success stories” that we received.


Magnetic Photo AlbumFirst, a little back story on those horrible magnetic albums and why they are evil. These older magnetic photo albums had pages covered in strips of tacky glue that would hold the photo and then were sealed under a clear plastic sheet. The glue, as it turns out, was highly acidic which had a two-fold effect.


Over time, the glue ate away at your photos, slowly destroying them as they sat on the shelf. Secondly, the glue, as it dried over the years, became extremely aggressive in maintaining the bond between the paper of the album and the photo which makes it really difficult to remove. Between the glue and the chemicals in the clear plastic sheet, it means certain doom for your photos sooner or later. It seems these albums were developed with only the short-term lifespan of photos in mind and I doubt there was much “stress-testing” on what would happen if the photos were left in the album for years.


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4 Online Vintage Photo Archives You Need to Check Out

vintage photosIf You Love Vintage Photos…


The invention of photography has been one of the greatest things to happen to the preservation of history. Both famous and personal events have been captured on film and illustrated for generations to re-live for years to come. Fortunately for us history fans, the Internet is teeming with interesting vintage photos you have to see to believe.


If you, like us, love to look through old vintage photos and try to piece together the thousand words they contain, then you need to check out these awesome vintage photo sites.

 

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Prepare for the Worst, Expect the Best: Observing National Preparedness Month

National Preparedness MonthWe’re in the business of preservation, so when National Preparedness Month rolls around each September, we take it very seriously. Disaster can strike anywhere, at any time, and for no reason whatsoever—but we can make sure we’re prepared.

 

Sponsored by FEMA and the Department of Homeland Security, National Preparedness Month was started to encourage everyone to be proactive in our approach to disasters. In fact, each week of September has its own theme:


  • September 1-5: Flood
  • September 6-12: Wildfire
  • September 13-19: Hurricane
  • September 20-26: Power outage
  • September 27-30: Lead up to National PrepareAthon! Day (September 30th)

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