Digital Hoarding: Why You Hold On To Digital Files

5 Tips To Identify If You’re An ‘e-Hoarder’


Digital Hoarding and why people hold on to those ever growing digital files was the topic discussed on the Mason Vera Paine WGN Radio show with guest, Mitch Goldstone president & CEO of ScanMyPhotos.com. LINK TO THE SHOW


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E-Hoarding, are you guilty of it? Do you still computer files you haven’t used in years, old mobile phones or tons of e-mails from years ago? Chances are you are an E-hoarder. Mitch Goldstone, President and CEO of ScanMyPhotos explains E-hoarding is and how to overcome it.


 

Mason Vera Paine

Mason Vera Paine: The Unabridged Millenial Show


What is digital (e-hoarding) and electronic clutter?  We are in an age of digital hoarding where everything is kept. Cheap or free storage is the foundation for this predicament. Digital hoarding is the accumulation of files and emails on a computer or other storage device.


5 Tips To Identify If You’re An ‘e-Hoarder’ 


  1. Are you constantly increasing your storage data plans?
  2. Is your desktop trash never or rarely emptied?
  3. Are old, obsolete computer devices cluttering up your home and work space?
  4. Have you never organized and categorized your digital photos, once scanned?
  5. Does your smartphone have dozens of unfamiliar apps that are NEVER used?

How To Solve The Digital Hoarding Problem 


Firstly, a precursor to e-hoarding, is ‘analog hoarding,’ where decades of papers, printed content and a library-sized worth of never viewed photo albums with photographs from nostalgic memories are piling up. Do you still have photo envelopes from the days of one hour photo labs with film negatives fading away from the ravages of time, 8mm film, VHS cassette tapes, APS film canisters, and 35mm slides? If so, Scan to digitally preserve all, then upload to preserve and organize with GooglePhotos.


5 Tips to Remedy Digital Hoarding 


  1. Remember, hard drives and email storage is finite
  2. Set aside a day to delete unused data
  3. Delete duplicate files (music is a great example). Anything that is redundant, trivial or obsolete
  4. Today, we take several identical pictures rather than one. Delete duplicates and bad photos, screenshots that you shared one time, blurry pictures, images of the food you ate last night, and the “I’m here, you’re not pictures” duplicates
  5. Go to the Control Panel on your computer, select “Uninstall” and review all the programs and content not used within 2 years. If it’s irrelevant, or an app that you used only once, delete it, with caution

Mason Vera Paine, the Unabridged Millennial Podcast:

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